Why doesn’t my Bible have Mark 7:16 in it?

To sum up the videos about whether or not we can trust the New Testament:

There is more manuscript support for the New Testament than for any other body of ancient literature.  Over five thousand Greek, eight thousand Latin, and many more manuscripts in other languages attest to the integrity of the New Testament.  There is only one basic New Testament used by Protestants, Roman Catholics, and Eastern Orthodox, by conservatives and liberals.  Minor variations in hand copying have appeared through the centuries, before mechanical printing began about A.D. 1450.
Some variations exist in spelling of Greek words, in word order, and in similar details.  These ordinarily do not show up in translation and do not affect the sense of the text in any way.
Other manuscript differences such as omission or addition of a word or clause, and two paragraphs in the Gospels, should not overshadow the overwhelming degree of agreement which exists among the ancient records.  We should rest assured that the most important differences in English translations of the New Testament of today are not due to manuscript differences, but to the way in which translators view the task of translation: How literally should the text be rendered?  How does the translator view the matter of biblical inspiration?  Does the translator adopt a paraphrase when a literal rendering would be quite clear and more to the point?

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The most important differences in English translations

of the New Testament of today are not

due to manuscript differences,

but to the way in which translators

view the task of translation

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The King James New Testament was based on the traditional text of the Greek-speaking churches, first published in 1516, and later called the Textus Receptus or Received Text.  Although based on the relatively few available manuscripts, these were representative of many more which existed at the time but only became known later.  It is now widely held that the Byzantine Text that largely supports the Textus Receptus (TR) has as much right as the Alexandrian or any other tradition to be weighed in determining the text of the New Testament.  However some readings in the TR have weak support as more ancient manuscripts have been discovered in the nineteenth and twentieth century.
Since the 1880s most contemporary translations of the New Testament (NIV, NASB, ESV) have relied upon a relatively few manuscripts primarily two manuscripts called Codex Vaticanus and Codex Sinaiticus, because of their greater age.  The Greek obtained by using these sources and the related papyri (which are the most ancient manuscripts) is known as the Alexandrian Text.

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Since the 1880s most contemporary translations

of the New Testament (NIV, NASB, ESV) have

relied upon the Greek obtained by using

Codex Vaticanus, Codex Sinaiticus and the

related papyri known as the Alexandrian Text

(which are the most ancient manuscripts)

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A third viewpoint of New Testament scholarship holds that the best text is based on the consensus of the majority of existing Greek manuscripts.  This text is called the Majority Text.  Most of these manuscripts are in substantial agreement.  Even though many are late, and none is earlier than the fifth century, usually their readings are verified by papyri, ancient versions, quotations from the early church fathers, or a combination of these.  The Majority Text is similar to the TR, but it is helpful in correcting those readings of the TR which have little or no support in the Greek manuscript tradition.
A good English translation of the Bible will tell you what Greek text their translation team is using as their foundation.  Of course in a few difficult cases in manuscript tradition the translators may follow a Greek text different from the text given preference.  In this regard the FOOTNOTES that accompany your English translation are an integral part of any translation, informing the reader of textual variations and difficulties and showing how these have been resolved by the translation team.  In addition to this, the footnotes indicate significant alternative readings and occasionally provide an explanation for technical terms or for a difficult reading in the text.

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A good English translation of the Bible

will tell you what Greek text their

translation team is using as their foundation.

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Once these facts are understood, the question above is easy to answer.  The reason your English translation of the Bible doesn’t have Mark 7:16 in it is due to which Greek manuscript the translators are working from.  However, a good Bible will have footnotes that will explain these things.  And an introduction before the Biblical text will often address these issues as well.

 

To watch the videos follow the links below:

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

 

Mark 4 Quiz

For Natalie and Cassie:

Mark 6b Quiz

For Tristan and Allison:

Mark 6a Quiz

For Nathaniel and Allison

What is Mark 7:16?

“If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear!”

Because this phrase is found in the Greek manuscript of the New Testament that became known as the “Textus Receptus”, or received text, that the original King James translators relied upon for their work in 1611, it is still found in today’s printings of the King James Version(translation), and the New King James Version(tranlation).

Why doesn’t my Bible have Mark 7:16 in it?

Excellent question brought up at quiz practice Cassie. And as promised we will begin answering and discussing it here, where we have time. Sad to say there are no “quick and easy” answers. So while I work on getting more up on the Blog, here is a video of a talk that deals with most of the issues we will be looking at over the next few days.I hope that the Holy Spirit is truly stirring all of you up to examine and defend His word in a way that conforms to the reality of history.

Vodpod videos no longer available.